Thesis theme header image

If I have a literal top section and bottom section of different content it doesn’t mean I want to have a big heading for the user to see that says “Top Section” or “bottom section” because that would be stating the obvious as they will most likely be separated in some visual way with styling . The semantic part comes in when another developer is reading the code and can see two sections with id’s of top-content and bottom-content.
As for trying to not use sections for styling, should I really have a redundant div around or inside a section to ensure I don’t use styles on the section? I know that’s not what you are saying, but I can’t think of any section on a page that I would not apply some style to even it it’s just a margin between sections.

Nice little trick Aaron; thanks! I’ve used it on a couple of my sites.
A couple notes for people concerned with the dotted lines – try adding overflow:hidden to your css. That seems to take care of the problem in Firefox.
Also, if you’re concerned with the negative indent and the impact it might have on Google searches, you could try giving the text a high line-height (line-height:400px) instead of the negative indent; and don’t forget to also include the overflow:hidden. A quick test of this seems to work in FF, IE9 and Chrome. And I’m only assuming that this gets around the Google SEO issue, but it could be worth a try.

Can you tell me if this is something I should be worried about? I haven’t been keeping track of all the little changes to colors, etc, but do I need to create a child theme? If so, can I simply make a copy of my entire theme folder in its current state and rename it parenttheme-child, then activate the “child theme” and make changes to the child theme folder’s css files from here on out? All I really want to do is ensure that any changes I’ve made and will continue to make end up staying there, even after doing necessary updates in the future!

Thanks WPgirl for the reco—what I have been looking for is a pluggin that allows a gallery set to be used, but each image can have it’s own url—to either a specific page in the site or url outside the site… I’ve been using a pluggin I found here: http:///wordpress/add-a-custom-url-to-your-wordpress-gallery-images/#comment-534742126  but can’t quite get it to work right (it doesn’t override the default setting of linking to image in lightbox or attachement page, even thought it let’s me put in a unique url associated with the image).

In practice, a CLUT is stored as a 3D volumetric color image (possibly “unwrapped” along the z = B axis to get a 2D version ). This may quickly become cumbersome when several hundreds of CLUTs have to be managed. Fortunately, G’MIC has a quite efficient CLUT compression algorithm (already mentioned in a previous article ), which has been improved version after version. So it was finally in a quite relax atmosphere that we added more than 60 new CLUT -based transformations in G’MIC , for a total of 359 CLUTs usable, all stored in a data file that does exceed 1.2 Mio . By the way, let us thank Pat David , Marc Roovers and Stuart Sowerby for their contributions to these color transformations.

Thesis theme header image

thesis theme header image

Thanks WPgirl for the reco—what I have been looking for is a pluggin that allows a gallery set to be used, but each image can have it’s own url—to either a specific page in the site or url outside the site… I’ve been using a pluggin I found here: http:///wordpress/add-a-custom-url-to-your-wordpress-gallery-images/#comment-534742126  but can’t quite get it to work right (it doesn’t override the default setting of linking to image in lightbox or attachement page, even thought it let’s me put in a unique url associated with the image).

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